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Pakistan Ancient City


Located about 50 kilometers from Islamabad, Taxila is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. It was conquered by different powers throughout history, including the Achaemenian and Mauryan empires, and many great rulers like Alexander walked its paths. Among Buddhists, the place is known as home to the world's first university. Many people visit the site today to experience the wonders of an ancient civilization. This story highlights the cultural richness and diversity of a place that we know today as Pakistan by taking viewers on a tour of Taxila and its age-old sculptures, ancient structures, and other historical artifacts. Danial Khan also spoke to experts and officials about efforts to preserve what remains of the ancient city for future generations.

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Pakistan Ancient City


Located about 50 kilometers from Islamabad, Taxila is one of the most famous archaeological sites in the world. It was conquered by different powers throughout history, including the Achaemenian and Mauryan empires, and many great rulers like Alexander walked its paths. Among Buddhists, the place is known as home to the world's first university. Many people visit the site today to experience the wonders of an ancient civilization. This story highlights the cultural richness and diversity of a place that we know today as Pakistan by taking viewers on a tour of Taxila and its age-old sculptures, ancient structures, and other historical artifacts. Danial Khan also spoke to experts and officials about efforts to preserve what remains of the ancient city for future generations.

 

Watch the story below:

 

exploring the ruins of taxila CREDITS

Writer/Reporter: Muhammad Danial Kublai Khan

Cameramen: Asif Mirza, Asif Afridi

Editor: Mohsin Zahoor

Producer/Fixer: Farhan Niazi

 

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Indonesia Hobbit Fossils


In 2003, remains of 3-feet tall humans believed to have existed some 12,000 years ago and nicknamed "hobbits" because of their height were first uncovered in an Indonesian cave. More than a decade after the discovery, new investigations reveal the hobbits (scientific name Homo florsiensis) may have existed much earlier: about 50,000 years ago. It is believed the findings can shed more light on human evolution and Indonesian pre-history. Silkina Ahluwalia visited the cave where the fossils were discovered, as well as spoke to archaeologists, historians, and other experts on the discovery's significance. She also explored plans to turn the site into a tourist attraction.

Indonesia Hobbit Fossils


In 2003, remains of 3-feet tall humans believed to have existed some 12,000 years ago and nicknamed "hobbits" because of their height were first uncovered in an Indonesian cave. More than a decade after the discovery, new investigations reveal the hobbits (scientific name Homo florsiensis) may have existed much earlier: about 50,000 years ago. It is believed the findings can shed more light on human evolution and Indonesian pre-history. Silkina Ahluwalia visited the cave where the fossils were discovered, as well as spoke to archaeologists, historians, and other experts on the discovery's significance. She also explored plans to turn the site into a tourist attraction.

 

Watch the story below:

 

‘HOBBIT’ fossils in indonesia CREDITS

Correspondent: Silkina Ahluwalia

Cameraman: Fakhrur Rozi

Fixer: Mochamad Andri

Editor: Fakhrur Rozi