2018-30 Memorie[00_03_34][20180904-152649-6].JPG
2018-30 Memorie[00_20_55][20180904-152730-7].JPG
2018-30 Memorie[00_03_34][20180904-152649-6].JPG

Copy of Thailand Landmines


The Thai-Cambodian border is said to the world’s largest landmine field. From the 1970s to the 1990s, thousands of mines were planted by warring military and insurgent groups. Many remain today. Martin Lowe followed the Thailand Mine Action Center (TMAC) as they conducted mine-clearance operations and spoke to them about their job hazards. He also found victims of mine explosions which include not just human victims maimed and shunned by society, but also elephants who suffered from severe injuries.

SCROLL DOWN

Copy of Thailand Landmines


The Thai-Cambodian border is said to the world’s largest landmine field. From the 1970s to the 1990s, thousands of mines were planted by warring military and insurgent groups. Many remain today. Martin Lowe followed the Thailand Mine Action Center (TMAC) as they conducted mine-clearance operations and spoke to them about their job hazards. He also found victims of mine explosions which include not just human victims maimed and shunned by society, but also elephants who suffered from severe injuries.

 

Watch the story below:

 

getting rid of thailand's landmines CREDITS

 

WRITER & CORRESPONDENT: MARTIN LOWE

CAMERAMAN & SEGMENT EDITOR: SINGHA QUANSUWAN   

ASSISTANT CAMERAMAN: SUPAPAT SUPAPUNPINYO

ASSISTANT PRODUCER: SIRAPAT PITIJINDA

 

2018-30 Memorie[00_20_55][20180904-152730-7].JPG

Copy of Lebanon Fighters for Peace


Fifteen years of civil war may have ravaged Lebanon, but a group of former fighters are determined to remember the mistakes of war and ensure that it never happens again. Former Christian, Muslim and Druze fighters, who earlier on would not hesitate to kill each other, have joined together to spread the message that war does not pay. Natalie Carney discovered that by speaking to at-risk youth in schools and communities, these former adversaries also hope to seek forgiveness from those they have hurt as a way of healing themselves.

Copy of Lebanon Fighters for Peace


Fifteen years of civil war may have ravaged Lebanon, but a group of former fighters are determined to remember the mistakes of war and ensure that it never happens again. Former Christian, Muslim and Druze fighters, who earlier on would not hesitate to kill each other, have joined together to spread the message that war does not pay. Natalie Carney discovered that by speaking to at-risk youth in schools and communities, these former adversaries also hope to seek forgiveness from those they have hurt as a way of healing themselves.

 

Watch the story below:

 

fighters for peace CREDITS

Correspondent: Natalie Carney

Cameraman: Halis Baltaci

Editor: Natalie Carney

Fixer: Gaby Jammal

Translator: Gaby Jammal

Special thanks to: Fighters for Peace, Ziad and Christine Saab