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In their own words


Low-skilled migrant workers are among the engines of Singapore’s economy, many of them working jobs that locals do not want and enduring life away from home. But they are also marginalized and voiceless in the bustling city-state. Outside their day jobs, some of them have found a platform to make their voices heard: poetry.  At an annual competition, Miro Lu met migrant workers who told their stories, and expressed their hopes and dreams, in lines and verses.

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In their own words


Low-skilled migrant workers are among the engines of Singapore’s economy, many of them working jobs that locals do not want and enduring life away from home. But they are also marginalized and voiceless in the bustling city-state. Outside their day jobs, some of them have found a platform to make their voices heard: poetry.  At an annual competition, Miro Lu met migrant workers who told their stories, and expressed their hopes and dreams, in lines and verses.

 

Watch the story below:

 

empowering migrant workers through poetry CREDITS

 

CORRESPONDENT: Miro Lu

CAMERAMAN & EDITOR: Nurul Amirah Haris

FIXER : Clara Lock

 

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Blessed by a ‘cursed’ flower


Liquor brewed from mahua flower is a favorite drink and traditional source of living in many rural communities in India. But the substance has also been blamed for rampant alcoholism and domestic violence in some villages, so much so that the flower is often considered a curse. Now some women are turning things around. In Jharkand, Jyothy Karat visited a village where women are making nutritional snacks and gaining economic empowerment from a flower they used to shun.

Blessed by a ‘cursed’ flower


Liquor brewed from mahua flower is a favorite drink and traditional source of living in many rural communities in India. But the substance has also been blamed for rampant alcoholism and domestic violence in some villages, so much so that the flower is often considered a curse. Now some women are turning things around. In Jharkand, Jyothy Karat visited a village where women are making nutritional snacks and gaining economic empowerment from a flower they used to shun.

 

Watch the story below:

 

earning a living from a 'cursed' flower CREDITS

Correspondent: Jyothy Karat

Editor : Sony Sasankan

Camera: Jyothy Karat/Anushree Bhatter

Translation : Praveen C M